Atlantic World Marine Archaeology Research Institute amari
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What Is AMARI?

The Atlantic World Marine Archaeology Research Institute (AMARI) is a research organization that concentrates on select archaeological and historical research projects pertaining to the greater Atlantic World. AMARI creates and partners in collaborations between research institutes, universities, museums, libraries, and individual archaeologists, historians, and researchers.

Our primary goal is to provide partial to full funding for selected projects decided upon by AMARI staff and advisory board. If you wish to submit a project proposal for consideration, please email the executive director, Dr. Katie Custer. AMARI is dedicated to providing funding for every stage of research projects from pre-disturbance surveys, excavation, post-excavation analysis, to publication, conference presentations and general dissemination of data, and public outreach. It is further committed to working with the institutions designated with the important task of curating, conserving, and displaying the resultant artifacts and data, and advising about the cost and methodology of these procedures.

AMARI truly believes that without the months and years of research before and after the exploration and excavation of archaeological and historical sites, the long hours spent preparing artefacts for display at a museum, and the time needed to analyze and publish the data; our maritime history and cultural heritage never leaves the sea floor or the archival repositories. 

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The “Atlantic World” epitomizes economic, geopolitical and cultural exchange within a vast region defined by the shores of the Atlantic Ocean. Geographically, it comprises Europe, Africa, North America and South America. Historically, it describes complex historical interactions within this geographical area. Its beginning is generally traced back to the Age of Exploration and subsequent conquest and colonization. Its closing stage extends all the way to the first half of the 19th century.   
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Warwick Project
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Galleon Warwick, 1619

   For the past three seasons, AMARI in partnership with the Center for Marine Archaeology and Conservation (CMAC) and the Institute of Nautical Archaeology (INA) at Texas A&M University and the National Museum of Bermuda (NMB) has excavated the Warwick, an English galleon that wrecked while at anchorage in Castle Harbour, Bermuda, in 1619.

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Bellarmine Jugs 

   Artist Jon Faulkner owner of the Bermuda Clayworks in the historic Royal Naval Dockyards in Bermuda created replicas of two 17th-century Bellarmine jugs from the Sea Venture shipwreck. Jon works primarily in stoneware and porcelain and creates his own glazes. 

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Repost: Real Shipwreck Treasure - inspiration and education

   Some people believe the most valuable thing that we can get from a shipwreck is information about the past. Others think that it is antiquities, or treasure. Shipwreck archaeology offers so much more. It is a chance to engage the public, to make history relevant and to inspire. I believe that active public outreach is an obligation that comes with the privilege of excavation. Continue Reading...

Warwick Project Blog
Explore other shipwreck excavations around the world with AMARI's research affiliate the Institute of Nautical Archaeology!  
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The GEOS Foundation supports geographical research and
scientific expeditions around the world. Follow reports from
the field on the GEOS blog.
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CMAC
Center for Maritime Archaeology and Conservation at Texas A&M University is a nautical, maritime, and underwater archaeology research organization which supported graduate students participating in the Warwick Project.

Watch our videos from the excavation of the Warwick!

AMARI would like to thank Rosewood Tucker's Point Resort in Bermuda
for generous support of the Warwick Project.

Through a joint educational initaitive with the National Museum of Bermuda and the Ocean Academy, the Warwick Project supported public outreach and marine heritage education in Bermuda.

Watch our latest 3D visualization and modeling of Warwick and Emerald Bay sites!